Norwegian has begun offering its passengers the chance to offset carbon emissions.

The airline has partnered with climate technology company CHOOOSE to add the option to offset into the check-out process when buying tickets.

Contributions will go towards a coastal wind energy development in Vietnam, a river-based hydro energy dam in Laos and converting landfill gas to energy in Thailand.

The low-cost long-haul carrier admitted emission-free flying is “not possible today” but said offsetting is an “important tool in managing today’s emissions”.

Norwegian carries about six million passengers to 30 destinations a year from its UK airports which include Gatwick, Manchester and Edinburgh.

It has recently been given six take-off and landing slots at Heathrow.


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Earlier on Thursday, Norwegian announced it was withdrawing its South American domestic flying programme by agreeing to sell-off its fledgling Argentinian subsidiary.

The sale came as Norwegian drafted in a former commercial chief from US low cost partner JetBlue Airways as interim chief commercial officer.

Geir Karlsen, acting chief executive of Norwegian, said: “Norwegian has been named one of the world’s most environmentally friendly airlines and we are continuously working to reduce our emissions through new initiatives.

“We’re now putting a price on actual carbon emissions from flying, making it easy for all our customers to take climate action.

“Even if commercial aviation technology continues to develop and Norwegian keeps reducing its environmental impact, emission-free flying is not possible today. Carbon offsetting is an important tool in managing today’s emissions, and we know that many of our customers would like to compensate for emissions associated with their journey.”

Norwegian has signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change’s pledge, committing to become carbon neutral by 2050.

“Putting a price on carbon in this way also helps driving more action and more ambition at all levels of society, including in business,” said Niclas Svenningsen, manager, Global Climate Action, UN Climate Change.

The airline said its fleet – with an average age of 3.8 years, is “one of the youngest aircraft fleets in the world”.