A sum of $100m has been pledged by Boeing to families and communities affected by two 737 Max crashes.

The payout is separate to lawsuits filed following the disasters which together killed 346 people and led to the grounding of the new generation aircraft in March.

Some estimates suggest the US manufacturer could face multiple claims for damages running into billions of dollars.

The $100 million will support education, hardship and living expenses for impacted families, community programmes, and economic development in impacted communities, Boeing said.

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What was described as an “initial investment” will be made over multiple years to address family and community needs of those affected by the Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 disasters in Indonesia and Ethiopia.

Boeing said it will partner with local governments and non-profit organisations to address these needs.

Company chairman, president and CEO Dennis Muilenburg said: “We at Boeing are sorry for the tragic loss of lives in both of these accidents and these lives lost will continue to weigh heavily on our hearts and on our minds for years to come.

“The families and loved ones of those on board have our deepest sympathies, and we hope this initial outreach can help bring them comfort.

“We know every person who steps aboard one of our airplanes places their trust in us. We are focused on re-earning that trust and confidence from our customers and the flying public in the months ahead.”


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Boeing will release additional information “in the near future”.

Employees at the firm will also have the opportunity to make donations in support of the families and communities impacted by the accidents. Boeing will match employee donations until the end of the year.

The US Federal Aviation Administration is continuing to evaluate a software fix and has stressed that the 737 Max will not be allowed to return to service until its is deemed safe to do so.

Meanwhile, budget carrier Norwegian revealed a 22,000 decline in June carryings to 3.5 million due to the 737 Max grounding.

CEO Bjorn Kjos said: “The total number of passengers declined slightly in June, due to the grounding of 18 Boeing 737 Max and less charter capacity.

“At the same time the number of long-haul passengers increased considerably.

“After taking delivery of one Dreamliner in June, we now have a long-haul fleet consisting of 36 new, more fuel-efficient aircraft.

“Following a period of significant expansion and investments, I’m pleased to see that the June figures show 10% higher unit revenue and that our growth is slowing down, in line with our strategy of moving from growth to profitability.”

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