EasyJet research highlights fare price drop

EasyJet research highlights fare price drop

EasyJet issued the results of price comparison research on the eve of its 20th anniversary to demonstrate how its fares have dropped against the rising price of other consumer goods.


The budget airline launched fares for the price of a pair of jeans in 1995, with starting rates between Luton and Glasgow of £29. 


Two decades later, lead-in fares on the same route are cheaper at £27.49 – a reduction of 5.2% despite Air Passenger Duty increasing by more than 160% in that period.


The price of the Levi’s jeans the original ad was based on have gone up from £32 to £75 today – an increase of 134%.


EasyJet commercial director, Peter Duffy, said: “When we began 20 years ago, it typically cost a couple of hundred pounds to fly into Europe. 


“EasyJet’s model of keeping costs low, to keep fares low and then only asking passengers to pay for the services they use, was revolutionary back in 1995.


“So it is fantastic that 20 years on we are still true to our roots and today’s Scottish starting fares now cost less than our original launch fare in ‘95.”


The official UK inflation rate has gone up 78% since November 1995. Property is the biggest riser – in 1995 the average UK house sold for £68,183. Today it is £295,000, a rise of 332%.?


A ticket to watch Arsenal 20 years ago, then playing at Highbury, cost £12.50. Today a similar seat at the Emirates is £45.69. 


Petrol, lager and cigarettes have all seen inflation busting rises since 1995 though much of that is down to the extra tax levied on them by the government which has also raised stamp prices by 152% from 25p then to 63p now.


Both tea bags and milk having seen their prices held back by the growth of budget supermarkets and loss leader promotions.


Other items have also dropped in price, including games consoles, books and vehicle tax for low emissions cars.

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