Monarch failure: Repatriation ‘progressing well’, says CAA

Monarch failure: Repatriation ‘progressing well’, says CAA

A total of 58 repatriation flights were operated yesterday as part of the aviation regulator’s efforts to return 11,478 people caught up in the Monarch failure back to the UK.

The Civil Aviation Authority plans to operate 54 flights today, bringing more than 11,091 people back to the UK.

This will leave about 87,431 passengers still to bring back to the UK over the next 12 days.

The repatriation efforts started within hours of the failure of Monarch on Monday with 64 flights returning 11,843 travellers.

CAA consumers and markets group director Richard Moriarty said: “Our operation to bring people home continues to progress well, with a total of 23,321 people already back in the UK, including the first planeload of passengers from Greece. We are planning 54 flights on 4 October, for an additional 11,091 people.

“Fight details for people due to travel back to the UK on 5 October are already published on monarch.caa.co.uk, our dedicated website which has already seen over one million visitors over the past couple of days.

“We have everyone’s original flight details and our plan is to publish new flight details as soon as possible, normally 24 hours in advance of travel.”

He added: “On 3 October, we published new information on claiming a refund for Atol protected customers whose trips were cancelled.

“Customers who booked directly with Monarch Holidays using a credit card, should contact their credit card issuer to make a claim for a refund.

“All other Monarch Holidays and all First Aviation Limited customers will be sent a claim form by 11 October, either directly by us or via their travel agent.”

The CAA will be providing regular updates as our flying programme develops.

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