Ryanair demands limit on alcohol sales at airports

Ryanair demands limit on alcohol sales at airports

Ryanair wants a ban on UK airports serving passengers more than two alcoholic drinks per person.

Chief executive Michael O’Leary confirmed Ryanair has written to the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) demanding a ban, saying: “There is a growing problem of drunken passengers on aircraft.

“We’re calling on the CAA to impose a limit of two alcoholic drinks on passengers at airports. We see no reason not to have a ban.”

O’Leary said: “There has been a 600% rise in UK passenger-disruption incidents [and] it’s a particular issue for airlines during flight delays.

“We’re calling for limit on consumption of alcohol at airports. We want a ban on all alcohol sales at airports before 10am and a limit to two or three alcoholic drinks per passenger thereafter.”

He insisted: “It’s a reasonable and modest proposal. There is a growing problem of drunken and loutish behaviour.”

O’Leary added: “You have to ask why anyone needs to load up before a flight. We don’t need hen and stag parties loading up at airports.

“This is not about us selling more drinks. Given our trolley service we wouldn’t be able to serve more than two drinks on a flight. It’s a safety issue.”

O’Leary said he is awaiting a response from the CAA.

The BBC reported in August on a 50% increase in arrests for drunken behaviour at UK airports and on flights in the past year.

This followed the introduction of a voluntary code of practice on alcohol sales at airports in July last year.

Airline association Airlines UK, which Ryanair joined this week, issued a statement following the BBC report saying: “We take the issue of disruptive passengers seriously.

“The industry is working hard to tackle the issue and launched a Code of Practice to create a common approach to prevent disruptive behaviour.

“Passengers should be aware the consequences of such behaviour could include losing a holiday because they are denied boarding, through to fines, flight bans and prison sentences for the most-serious offences.”

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